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Somewhere in Translation 26日12月2014年

Hey everyone. DzyDzyDino here.

It's been a little bit since my last entry. Since then, we've picked up a couple new series and have a lot going on this winter here at Mangastream. It's pretty exciting.

We've picked up-
Akame Ga Kill!
Seven Deadly Sins (Nanatsu no Taizai)
Sukedachi 09

and also been working on a few of Matsuena's post-HSDK One-Shots. Got a few more things in the works as well, so definitely look forward to it.

Akame ga Kill and Seven Deadly Sins are both definitely "new" series, in terms of manga. Although we've hopped onto these partway through, and they already have a lot of established canonical vocabulary.

That's what I'd like to talk about a bit. What becomes standard, canon, or part of the fandom when a series starts.

This is pretty much completely up to the translator that starts the series. For example, we've had the opportunity of picking up Sukedachi 09 straight from the first issue. So far, I've found it to be an exciting series. Vox has been working with me on translating it and establishing much of the "standard vocabulary" for it.

What I mean by standard vocabulary is, for example, why in Naruto we referred to techniques often as jutsu, why sharingan and rasengan were left as such rather than translated. Kazekage. Konoha. Why some groups refer to Nine-Tails as Kyuubi, shadow clones as kage-bunshin, etc.

Every series has terms which either have decidedly more flavor left in Japanese, or has Japanese terms that have certain subtleties that get lost in translation. (Like the ubiquitous "nakama" from One Piece). Sometimes they're just for flavor.

Sometimes it's even done by the author, but gets lost because of lack of translation. Like the manga Akame ga Kill. It's literally アカメが斬る. Akame Ga Kiru. Kiru is how kill would be pronounced in Japanese, and written like this, it actually does mean kill... but specifically, to kill by slicing or slashing with a blade. Which ties in with Akame and her Murasame. The same Kiru is used in all the chapter names.

Often too, some terms or concepts, especially names, get "cropped" in favor of localizing the series. Where rather than explain some cultural reference or some deeper meaning, it just gets translated to something more convenient. Often these end up as reocurring themes that have to get changed every time if the translator chose to chop it out the first time.

For Sukedachi 09, we're trying to provide as much of the original meaning as possible. As it is, I'll try to provide either a blog entry or a featured comment in the Disqus comments at the end of the chapter explaining. I'm sure Vox will have some input on the chapters, as well.

I'll just throw out a few of the terms I bumped into in Sukedachi, and later on in Vox wants to add anything, I'm sure he will :)

First off is the name of the Series, Sukedachi Nine.

A literal definition of sukedachi (助太刀) is like backup, seconds, a guy waiting in the wings, perhaps even something like a tag-team partner waiting to jump in when you go down. It's written with with the kanji for assisting or helping (助 suke) + long sword (太刀 tachi). This is what's written on the backs of their uniforms.

The people that are sukedachi are referred to as Sukedachi-Nin (助太刀人). Nin means person (can also be pronounced jin), and is the usual ending for professions, much like -man is in english. For a more natural sound, I use Sukedachi to refer to the people as well. Like "We are Sukeadchi." as opposed to "We are Sukedachi-Nin", although you can't deny there's something interesting behind Sukedachi-Nin(e) :). The series is full of little wordplays like this.

The term for Vengeance they use in this series is is Adauchi (仇討). Which is pretty literally "vengeance" (as opposed to revenge (fukushuu 復讐). Sukedachi is sometimes used to mean vengeance in this series too, and depending on its meaning, I sometimes translate it as vengeance.

The term used for reversing a vengeance is Kaeri-Uchi (返り討ち). This term is so specific, that I've kept it in Japanese. Loosely, it can be used like turning the tables on someone. But literally, like when someone challenges you to something or is expecting to defeat you and you turn the tables on them. It also has a definition of killing someone would was trying to take vengeance on you. "Killing a would-be avenger." Rather specific, no? So I've left this as Kaeri-Uchi.

There's so much going on in this series, that if I were to fill up one blog post with all of it, it would go on and get really long. I'll leave you with two more chapter specific things on Sukedachi 09.

The "Cautious Driving" and "Presumptious Driving" from chapter 1 and part in chapter 2 were literally "Kamoshirenai-unten (かもしれない運転)" and "Darou-unten (だろう運転)". Unten means "driving". Kamoshirenai means "maybe", and darou kinds of mean "probably". The basis being the kamoshirenai-unten driver would always be like, "there might be someone around the corner. maybe i should stop and check this way and that way. maybe the light might turn red.". The "darou" driver presumes everything like "there probably wont be anyone at the intersection." "That guy will probably yield to me" "I can probably make this turn safely". and so on.

The names in this series are also very colorful. We'll take a look at the criminal's name for chapter 02. His name is Hige Gokuo (卑下獄夫).獄 is the Goku from jigoku (地獄) which means hell, and means prison (jigoku literally translates to earth prison). 夫 means husband or man. So his first name kind of prisoner or prison's husband.

It's his family name that's interesting. 卑下 (hige) means humility or self-deprecation. Putting yourself down. Etc. Not to the level of self-loathing, but still in that vein. Hige can also mean beard (髭), and this goes into play with the character, with the stubble on his chin. Apart from his catch phrase about his specialties, he has this phrase when he gets excited where he literally says "my beard is getting goosebumps".

That sounds a bit silly in English, especially when his name isn't "beard" in english, and in English beard is more a full grown beard and not just stubble.

Phew! That was a mouthful!
With all these new series, there's a lot of little bits I'd love to get caught up on. I'll try to write weekly and bring you all up to speed on all the little tidbits from these series. Sukedachi Nine is really promising and exciting so far, I have high hopes for it! If you haven't checked it out yet, try and do so!

Anyways, happy holidays! Have a merry christmas, happy hannukah, kwanzaa, whatever!

-DzyDzyDino

P.S. Because I said I would mention it, one more bit about Nanatsu no Taizai, there's the character named Death Pierce who popped up recently. Now, in Japanese, a Pierce (ピアス) is an earring or a piercing in the jewelry sense. The first part, DESUPIA kind of sounds like "Despair" too, which Oda used in One Piece in the Sky Piea arc, Enel's Ark Maxim had his dark clouds move called "DEATH PIEA" which also was a play on Despair and the whole sky piea/death piea thing.

Also something to think about, DEATH in Japanese is pronounced です which most easily e a conjugation of "to be". Therefore, dying and existing are the same word depending on how it's used. :)

Okay, Merry Xmas from us at Mangastream!!