Fairy Tail Zero 004 - Dances with Blades
Fairy Tail Ice Trail 004 - A Fleeting Glimpse
Fairy Tail 405 - Tartaros Arc: Part 6 - Magna Carta

Naruto - The Conflict between Message and Readers' Expectations

Posted Jul 22nd, 2014 by Jinn

Since the beginning of the series, Naruto spread messages against hatred and war. You could notice it already in the first episode, when Naruto declares his wish to be Hokage and prove himself in the eyes of the villagers who hate him, and later on when Iruka accepts Naruto as a human being and not a monster that killed his parents.

During the pre-Shippuden part, these kind of messages keep popping up in some occasions. For example, Naruto's speech in the Zabuza arc in attempt to explain that ninjas are people with emotions and not just tools of war. But the important thing for this discussion is; the message of the manga was never a main key element in the plot itself at that time.

The focus changed during the Shippuden part, and the message of the series became the main topic of the story. You could see it clearly in the Pain arc and Nagato's ideology of "The Cycle of Revenge". The manga's message, brought to the readers by Naruto, is that hatred and war can be stopped if people choose to cease violence. In this particular case - not killing Nagato and avenging the death of his beloved sensei. Eventually, Naruto beats Nagato by the infamous "Let's Talk no Jutsu" which most of the readers feel uneasy with.

Now, let's discuss recent events. Since Sasuke's defection from Konoha, the readers expected the manga to end with a final clash to the death between him and Naruto, who both were presented as eternal rivals since their bromance in episode 3.

But it's not going to happen.

Why is that? Mainly, because it will contradict the entire message of the manga. This turn of events was hinted since Hashirama's story about the founding of Konoha with Madara in hope to stop the blood spilling between the clans, and became even clearer by Naruto's and Sasuke's recent conversation with the Six Paths - in order to achieve peace, the endless fight between Senju and Uchiha must stop. Naruto and Sasuke fighting to the death now would only mean that nothing has changed.

So here lies the conflict: What should a writer do - fulfill the readers' expectations or stick to his message to the end, whether the readers like it or not?

 

Note: This blog post was devised and written by adi P. If you're also interested in submitting your ideas for a blog post, you can find all the instructions on how to become active yourself here: http://mangastream.com/blog/39


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Fairy Tail Zero & Fairy Tail Ice Trail

Posted Jul 17th, 2014 by Jinn

These two spin-off chapters were serialized in the debut issue of Mashima's own, new monthly, "Monthly Fairy Tail Magazine".

The first, Fairy Tail Zero, details the meeting of the founders of Fairy Tail and exactly what happened between them to lead them to found the guild. Ice Trail is a spin-off manga concerning Gray.

Both were written under Mashima's supervision, but while Mashima personally draws Zero himself, his executive assistant Shirato Yuusuke is the artist behind Ice Trail. Both are therefore official canon. Also published in the magazine are two special art pieces of Natsu and Igneel, which we have included as part of the first chapter.

Both of these series are monthlies and we will continue to cover them as they come out.

 


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Interpretations vs Adaptations

Posted Jul 14th, 2014 by Jinn

I recently watched the Death Note anime and I noticed that, aside from a handful of scene changes, it was almost shot-for-shot with the manga. There was no filler and besides translation differences, the dialogue was pretty well the exact same the entire way through. I found that this actually hurt the anime, as characters continually explaining what they just did really slowed down the action, and there was no improvement on the disappointing ending.

This got me thinking on manga adaptations in general. Manga is a unique form of story telling, as it provides a fully-functioning storyboard within its medium. This means that most anime will just be a colorful, moving read-aloud of the manga they are based on, with almost no artistic liberty given to the script writer or story boarder. As well, seasons are generally not limited to a small, abstract number of episodes, so the story doesn't need to be shortened.

Now, compare this to other stories: novels have to be compressed to fit screen time, so many scenes are removed, added or changed; American comic books have inconsistent plots written by multiple authors, so a few concepts and characters are chosen and turned into a screenplay; most TV series are very episodic, so reboots just create an entirely new plot. This method of interpreting a story, opposed to adapting it, is a double edged sword. Sometimes, through inconsistencies or just sloppy production, the interpretation does not do the source material justice. Meanwhile, there are others that have taken the story above and beyond what it had been before, albeit in a changed fashion.

So, what if we were to apply this concept of “interpretation” to manga? Say an animation company got the rights to reboot a big anime, like Dragon Ball or Full Metal Alchemist (or, most recently, Sailor Moon), this time with the artistic freedom to change the story as they pleased, while keeping to the very bare-bones plot. Would you, as a manga reading community, welcome the change and like to see how things could be done differently? How many of you would say that the changes could somehow “ruin” the source manga, and why? What series would you like to see changed into an interpretation, rather than a simple manga adaptation? Any suggestions of your own on how you would change a favorite story in a more cinematic way?

 

Note: This blog post was devised and written by Adam. If you're also interested in submitting your ideas for a blog post, you can find all the instructions on how to become active yourself here: http://mangastream.com/blog/39

 


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Power Scaling And Power Ups

Posted Jul 10th, 2014 by Jinn

Whenever I read manga, one thing I value very highly (since it helps me enjoy the fighting more) is the attention to proper power scaling and balance with regards to power ups. By power scaling I mean keeping in mind a definite level of power and ability for characters and using that to relate to how they fare in battle with their opponents. Even when this isn’t explicitly shown (as in Dragon Ball Z), I find it helps me enjoy it a lot.

An example in One Piece, is seeing Usopp going against Trebol and Sugar, knowing there is no way he can win against them and wondering how Oda is going to pull a victory off. Mangas I think have good attention to power scaling are Feng Shen Ji, One Piece, Soul Eater, Berserk, History’s Strongest, UQ Holder and Negima. Those I believe don’t seem to give it much importance are Bleach (the recent defeat of Zaraki) and Fairy Tail.

With regards to power ups, usually they tend to feel very biased in favour of protagonist when not handled properly. An example, in my opinion are the free christmas (or easter) gifts Naruto and Sasuke got from the Sage of the Six Paths, and Orihimes tears bringing a dead Ichigo back to life with a plethora of abilities suited for dealing with Espada number 4.

What do you think? Do you feel power scaling and power ups need to be handled right in shounen manga or do they just not matter? Has a correct or abysmal handling of them ever made a significant difference in your enjoyment of a manga? If so, can you share those experiences?

Note: This blog post was devised and written by Lightsyde. If you're also interested in submitting your ideas for a blog post, you can find all the instructions on how to become active yourself here: http://mangastream.com/blog/39


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A Consideration of Reading Choices

Posted Jul 3rd, 2014 by Jinn

Have you ever made the decision to step out of your comfort zone and read a manga that you knew little about? Consider the different factors involved in the decision whether or not to give a manga a try.

First off, what drew you to mangas like One Piece, Naruto, and Bleach in the first place? Was it the strong personalities of the characters? Was it the storyline that had you wrapped up from page one? Or was it just because it is popular and you could discuss it with your friends on a weekly basis?

Many previous posts have attempted to generalize these most popular manga series. This is because the most popular manga (OP, Naruto, Bleach) are like popular music: formulaic and catchy. Researchers have determined that pop music is basically crack for your brain. Naruto was the "gateway" manga that got me hooked on the medium, but it is easily not the most meaningful manga I have read.

Manga, like any other art form, can elicit many different emotions from a reader other than just giddy excitement. So please consider what you want from reading manga. Can you suggest a series that is meaningful to you and believe other people should read? To begin, that series for me is Homunculus (Mature/Seinen Drama).

 

Note: This blog post was devised and written by Zach. If you're also interested in submitting your ideas for a blog post, you can find all the instructions on how to become active yourself here: http://mangastream.com/blog/39


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Do you think Bleach should have ended after Aizen's defeat?

Posted Jun 29th, 2014 by Jinn

For a while, I agreed with the argument that Tite Kubo should have ended the manga series, Bleach, when Aizen died. The following arcs after Aizen seemed like Kubo trying to milk his success on Bleach's popularity, and that if it did end with Aizen's defeat, the series would be a master piece.

The fullbring arc felt like a rushed and disappointing excuse to return Ichigo's power in order to continue the series. Even now, this feeling remains. In my opinion, not only was it  terrible, but also boring.

But now with the Quincy's arc, I realised that Kubo's purpose of extending Bleach seems to have more meaning behind it, and that's to answer the mystery between the Shinigami and Quincy, along with the king of Soul Society. This might spoil a little, but Uryuu Ishida's family and past has been very vaguely shown early in the series, showing the struggle of the Quincy's beliefs and the Shinigami's system. There's also the problem with Ichigo's parentage - why is it important for him to belong in both sides of the war? Is Ichigo a "Romeo and Juliet" device, ultimately reuniting the Shinigami and Quincy (possibly through his death) due to his race?

My opinions on whether Bleach should have continued or not changed. I think it's good for Kubo to answer the mysteries he created in the first place, and Bleach is finally getting more and more interesting again. Do you agree? Is there any more mysteries Kubo created previously that hasn't been fully explained? Would you have been satisfied without knowing the past between Quincy and Shinigami?

 

Note: This blog post was devised and written by Rhastae. If you're also interested in submitting your ideas for a blog post, you can find all the instructions on how to become active yourself here: http://mangastream.com/blog/39


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Go On, Finish It! But...How?

Posted Jun 24th, 2014 by Jinn

As I was recapitulizing on FMA and how perfect in tune its ending was with the general concept of the series, I got around to thinking about how I would end a manga, specifically a shounen manga. So I presumed I had a series running in Jump for example (yeah, I've been watching / reading Bakuman lately, I admit it), and my editor and I came to the point where we both agree that it's time to move on and let my story end. Would I let the protagonist (or at least deuteragonist) die? Is that marketable? Would people still like it? Would I like it, after all the hours I probably would have put into creating, developing and drawing this little guy or girl for years of my life? Or should I make it a pretty, wibbly-wobbly, timey-dimey... ah, happy ending? Facing a decision like that must be pretty harsh. So I'm asking this: How would you want your favourite shounen series to end?

Now I myself am not really thinking that much about Bleach and Naruto. Possibilities in these two series are getting more and more limited, and I don't want to skip ahead to it. I'm waiting for Kubo-dono and Kishimoto-dono to show us their idea of a satisfying ending. No, personally, I really focused on the road down the Grand Line, speculating (once again) what finale would fit One Piece's and Oda-dono's style the best. I for myself would love to see Luffy not become the Pirate King. Wait, what did he say? Yeah, I love seeing him in the role of the challenger, you know? It's the same with Ippo. Whenever he's defending I'm not nearly half as thrilled as when he's challenging. And I love that about Luffy. He always goes places he's not supposed to, and he always gets it done in a way you wouldn't expect of an established, worldwide-renowned and feared pirate. He's the guy who gets his excitement out of upsetting the odds, as is typical for shounen, I admit. But he does it in his own airheaded, yet totally passionate and awesome way. And even if those upsets will become more and more of a rare sensation as he closes in on the very strongest, I still don't want him to end up as a ruler or a patron or whatever, effectively becoming the strongest guy around.

But that's only me and my strange ideas. How would you want to see it end? What ending would you see fit, if not for One Piece then for Naruto, Bleach or Fairy Tail? Do you even want One Piece to end? Perhaps I don't...

 

Note: This blog post was devised and written by Crowy. If you're also interested in submitting your ideas for a blog post, you can find all the instructions on how to become active yourself here: http://mangastream.com/blog/39


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Romance In Shonen

Posted Jun 17th, 2014 by Jinn

Shonens seem to have some trouble dealing with romantic issues. Yes, obviously there are fantastic mangas about human relationships, but I'm talking about shonen in particular. I've found the way all my favorite shonens handle the relations between the sexes unsatisfactorily to say the least. They tend to skirt around issues of dating and attraction, or simply relegate them to comedic relief moments. I've never quite understood this.

To me, having characters show romantic feelings - and all the joy and heartbreak that goes along with it - is one of the most convincing ways to make characters come alive, to make them endearing and relatable. Characters will ramble on and on about protecting nakama, but what about protecting the woman/man you love? Those feelings should be just as powerful.

It seems the authors are uncomfortable talking about these issues. Is it that they themselves are unsure of how to properly depict their characters in such a way? Do they not know how to write romantic scenes? Or are they afraid they'll bore their younger audiences?

Let me pick on One Piece for a moment, because it's a manga almost all of you have read. What would change if One Piece dealt with mature romantic relationships between the characters? Wouldn't it be entertaining if Nami ever reciprocated Sanji's feelings, if even just a little? Or if Robin and Zoro started showing some feelings for each other? To me these situations would make the Strawhat Crew an even more endearing family. Instead all we get is Sanji's nose bleeding and Brook stealing panties. We all know Oda is a fantastic storyteller, so why has he ignored these potentially captivating story threads?

What do you think? Do you want more romance and relationships in your mainstream shonen, or do you think it's a waste of space? Why do you think this aspect of life has been so overlooked in these works? Are there any shonens you read that get it right?

 

Note: This blog post was devised and written by Stephen. If you're also interested in submitting your ideas for a blog post, you can find all the instructions on how to become active yourself here: http://mangastream.com/blog/39


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Implied Deaths vs. Shown Deaths

Posted Jun 9th, 2014 by Jinn

Because of the demographic to which many of our favorite series appeal, implied deaths have become a norm in flagship pieces such as One Piece and Naruto.

In One Piece there are many implied deaths during arcs like Water 7, Impel Down, The Paramount War, etc. I mean how do you feel knowing that Luffy murdered a large number of people while trying to save his brother, i.e. the guards who fell to their deaths in the boiling water/blood, soldiers and pirates during the rescue, etc.?

In Naruto countless Shinobi die without so much as an introduction, whilst a main character like Neji is used as an emotional tool for the readers.

Do you think it’s OK for authors to use secondary characters’ deaths merely as fodder, and use main character deaths as an emotional tool? We aren’t saying that those moments aren’t fun (like when a planet blows up in DBZ) but isn’t it a little bit cavalier in teaching kids in about how little value some lives have, versus the weight that the lives of “important” people have? It would be absolutely impossible to give a voice to every character, and the deaths of the main characters have weight because of our attachment to them. Still, it sometimes bothers me that these fun-loving characters murder all the time. Just a thought.

Do you, our esteemed patrons, ever feel the same?

 

Note: This blog post was devised and written by James and his crew of two. If you're also interested in submitting your ideas for a blog post, you can find all the instructions on how to become active yourself here: http://mangastream.com/blog/39

 


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The Four Tribes Of Manga

Posted Jun 1st, 2014 by Jinn

While browsing through TED I came across an interesting talk titled “The Visual Magic of Comics”, by Scott McCloud, an American cartoonist who is better known for his nonfiction books about comics. Among the topics he touched on was his categorization of different types of art. McCloud calls it the “four tribes of art”, which can be applied to any medium of art including music, literature, film, and manga.

As the label suggests, there are four groups in McCloud’s classification. The first group of artists are called animists. This group is best characterized by their devotion to transparency of content. They emphasize the substance that comprises their works. The second group, classicists, are devoted to beauty and craft. They seek to perfect the composition of their art, and this goal remains priority above all on their list. The third group, iconoclasts, are devoted to the truth and nothing else. They seek to portray the human experience as it is, as raw as it can be in its truest form. They are couriers carrying authentic messages of the human condition. Last but not least, the formalists are distinguished from the others in their love for experimenting with their art. They are devoted to form, which includes details of style and technique in their art and those of others.

It is important at this point to clarify that no artist can be described as being only “classicist” or only “animist”. This classification is useful because it allows us to identify qualities that every artist possesses, only in different proportions. Needless to say these proportions are what make each artist unique.

With my newly acquired awareness of McCloud’s four tribes of art, I couldn’t help classifying every manga that crossed my mind. For most shonen manga such as One Piece, Naruto, and Bleach, the authors seem to have equal proportions of animist and classicist qualities. Although the plot is crucial, as it is in every story telling medium, because manga is a visual medium its art is equally important, especially because it lays out the world the reader comes into contact with.

With certain seinen manga such as Berserk, I see more of the classicist qualities. The artwork is beautiful, and you can immediately appreciate the amount of effort that must have went in the process of drawing each chapter. The iconoclast qualities of devotion to the truth is also more prevalent in the genre of seinen manga, such as one of my most favorite works, Monster by Urasawa Naoki.

Formalist qualities are very hard to see in manga. Many prominent manga authors have experimented with their technique and developed a style of their own, but in many of the mainstream manga that dominate the markets today, art styles have become standardized. It would be more interesting to see more experimentation on the market, because it is something that has become all too rare.

Scott McCloud’s classification of art gives us a great way to think about manga. Can you identify your favorite works as having the qualities of one or more of these tribes of art? I would love to hear about everyone’s opinions.

 

Note: This blog post was devised and written by Brian.


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Pick Your Poison

Posted May 29th, 2014 by Jinn

Every long-running manga generally develops a formula. It is a dreaded, yet sometimes necessary tactic for lengthening a manga. Some mangaka rely too heavily on the formula, and it makes the story stagnant. Others figure out how to keep it exciting, even if the reader knows the general formula. Below are some of the formulas I have noticed in the Big 3, plus a note on DBZ and HxH.

Bleach: Fight a super-strong enemy, and right when things look really bad, get a mega boost and overpower them. Get the enemy against the ropes, only for the enemy to reveal they were hiding their true power all along. Hero gets beaten nearly to death (but you are made to think they are dead). Then another hero (who just got a power boost from secret training) saves the day. Rinse repeat, and nobody but the bad guys die.

Naruto: Present an enemy. That's not your real enemy, but you won't know that until you defeat the decoy. Use team effort to defeat the decoy. Sometime between defeating the decoy and defeating the true enemy, everyone else gets overpowered and they put their trust in Naruto. Naruto has beefed up sometime before the final battle, and OP-Naruto saves the day.

One Piece: The Strawhat Crew is going somewhere, but ADD Luffy gets distracted and decides to do a side mission. The crew eventually splits up (Zoro always gets lost, Sanji always gets distracted by a girl). All of the crew fight someone of greater strength and just barely manage to win. They move on to the next place, slightly stronger, and with a bigger bounty on their hands. (They may or may not have picked up a crew member.)

Hunter x Hunter / Dragonball Z: You fight. You get defeated. You train. You get stronger. Some people die. You fight again. You win. (One story is severely more complex than the other though.)

 

Do you agree with the assessment, or have you found a formula of your own, maybe for a different series? What are your favorite and / or most despised formulas? What do you think about formulas in general? A necessary evil? Did you spot any exceptions to the listed formulas above?

 

Note: This blog post was devised and written by bijun.


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A Thank You

Posted May 29th, 2014 by Jinn

I want to thank all those of you who submitted an article for the blog. Sadly, out of the 53 we got so far, we can only post one at a time. We got a few pretty good ones and an even bigger number of articles that have great ideas in them but need some rewriting and sometimes shifting of focus to make them work. There's also quite a bunch that won't make it on the site, mostly for the same simple reasons, which I'd like to mention here so a) the same mistakes hopefully won't be done again and b) you'll understand our reasons better, which I feel we owe to all of you who put in an effort writing these up.

Most of the articles that we won't be putting up were still a fun read. They were, but they didn't provide much of a basis to discuss anything further. In fact, that's the main issue with most of them. Neglecting the discussion aspect is a big problem, we don't want to just provide a platform for stating opinions.

Also we're not going to put up reviews. Neither reviews of (non-mainstream) manga, nor chapter reviews. For chapter reviews, you got discussion threads at the end of each chapter and for manga... well, we might have a special and post one or two of those, but not right now, not while we have plenty of material that we know people will definitely be interested in talking about.

There were a few that were just way too short, or not thought out at all, but fortunately, they were the exception. In general, I'm pretty happy with what we got and I thoroughly enjoyed reading them all.

The submission for blog topics is still open and will stay so until further notice. If you're interested, check out this blog post explaining all the details: http://mangastream.com/blog/39

And since I've been all big on encouraging you to concentrate on asking questions in this blog post, I've also got one for you: Would it really bother you not knowing whether your submission will be posted eventually or whether it's just been sorted out for one of the reasons stated above?

Three thoughts from me on that: Emailing everyone back is a pain in the neck when I also have lots of other tasks here, like working on the manga every week. Not a big fan of template-emails, I still treat emails as something personal and would rather keep it that way. And finally, for a number of them I just don't know yet - there are quite a few with very similar topics and eventually one will probably be chosen; and it also depends on how many and what kind of quality submissions we get in the future - there are factors involved that make it hard to tell for many of them.


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Looking For Writers For The Blog

Posted May 24th, 2014 by Jinn

So, truth be told, I've been running out of ideas for blog entries lately. No surprise there really, I barely manage to squeeze out any at all in between working on various series. Could really need some help with that, so I figured I'd ask our community; in other words - you lovely lot.

Some organizational things first, or general things to consider:

  • Blog posts have to be in English - decent English, if you aren't a native speaker but have great ideas for topics, ask someone to help proofread your article / post.
  • I have no idea how well this will be received, if nobody's interested then that's that, but if you suddenly mail us 50 new topics per week - well, I'll be honestly sorry but I'll have to pick 2 out of that bunch at most, as we aren't going to post more than 2 new topics per week.
  • Your topics should be neither too short, nor too long. Don't ask for word-counts, just consider that most people don't want to spend more than 5 minutes reading something before they can post their own opinions about it. Don't make it a giant rant - unless it's a great one, heh.
  • Your topics should create discussions. They can (should, really) be (thought-)provoking, you can be partial, and you should end them with a question or two that can be discussed, or with a thought that can be commented upon.
  • The topics should definitely have something to do with manga. It can be a post about say, adaptations of manga in video games - which series are fit for it, which aren't, and so on. It can be about light-novels based on manga or vice versa. It can definitely be, and that's probably most appropriate, about a specific topic of a specific series or group of series. Like Bleach vs OP vs Naruto, I dunno. Ideally you'll talk about big series and make your point there, so as many people as possible can express their opinions about it. Wouldn't mind a topic highlighting some great non-mainstream obscure series either though. Basically, stick to manga.
  • If we do have lots of submissions, we'll be tough judges and pick the best posts. There's absolutely no guarantee we'll be featuring your post, though be assured that at least 2 people will read it in any case, haha. Seriously though, even if you don't get featured, we very much appreciate your participation. Honestly.


If the above didn't scare you off, feel free to email your blog post article to -- smokybarrettms (at) gmail (dot) com -- please put 'blog post' in the title of your email so it doesn't land in the spam folder. Also don't forget to give your article a title.

And I probably shouldn't have to say this but before anyone asks - of course we'll give credit where credit is due. You'll be clearly stated as the author of the post, just let us know which moniker you want to go by.


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Your Manga Needs You! (aka Recruitment)

Posted May 17th, 2014 by Smoky

It's that time again! We're looking to add a few more people to the team, mainly people who can help with Jump (because soon we'll be working on five Jump series and that's... a lot). That means we need people who can be available for a few hours any time between 6:30am GMT to 3:00pm GMT every week on Wednesday. The two main positions we're looking to fill are:

Redrawers - are probably the highest demand right now. Feel free to download the test and give it a try even if you have no experience because we're likely to offer you some training either way - redrawing mainly needs a good eye for detail. The main thing to aim for, when you remove the overlay text, is a seamless transition between your art and the mangaka's.

Test: Download this file, redraw the page and send it to: smokybarrettms (at) gmail (dot) com

Typesetters - this one you really do need some previous experience for because training people from scratch takes a huge amount of time and effort. You do not need to use any particular fonts, just go for something simple. We'll be judging based on shapes and sizes for now.

Test: Download this file, typeset all four pages and send them to: smokybarrettms (at) gmail (dot) com

Feel free to tell me a little bit about yourself and any relevant experience you may have; things like timezone and schedule are fairly essential for me to know. We very much appreciate everyone who takes the time to apply so thank you!

Oh and, exceptional editors are always welcome too - if you want to apply as a cleaner, just send me an email.


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If You Were To Write Your Own Shonen Manga

Posted May 15th, 2014 by Jinn

Imagine your favorite mangaka calls you up and asks you for your help. He's wrapping up his current series and really needs ideas for his next manga. What would you suggest?

I'm really interested in hearing some of your story ideas, I love reading short plot-overviews, and it's fun to find out what kind of stories all of you would write, what you all are into. Maybe there's some kind of plot idea that you've been spinning in your head for years?

Are there plots or certain kinds of characters that you feel are too rare in mainstream series and if they are present for once, they are done really badly and you'd write them completely differently?

But also, are there any aspects about shonen manga that you feel are really overused and you'd make a great effort avoiding them?

Looking forward to your ideas!


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Your Favorite Sports Series?

Posted Apr 29th, 2014 by Jinn

As the title says, what's your favorite sports series? My personal top three are;

1. Hajime no Ippo

2. Captain Tsubasa

3. Eyeshield 21

Now, don't judge me on Captain Tsubasa, I was little so the series holds nostalgic value. Ippo I discovered pretty late, but it's my favorite sports series by far. Heck, it's probably among my top three series of all times.

What is it that makes a sports series more enjoyable than others? Honestly, the part I enjoy most is humor; somehow sports series simply sem to have a lot more room that you can fill with jokes and Takamura-moments. One thing I don't enjoy? Dragged out scenes. You know what I'm talking about if you also read Ippo. On the other hand, they don't seem all that bad when you read a big amount of chapters in one go instead of following it weekly. And if you really want to experience dragged out scenes, read one of them football/soccer mangas like Captain Tsubasa, where the field appears to be several kilometers long in each direction and they just keep running and running and running and running and...

Now I lost my train of thought. Not that really ever had one - oh yeah, I was saying, or rather asking - which are your favorite sports series, and what is it about them that makes them so special to you? Let me know in the comments!

 


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