Somewhere in Translation: 03

Timeskip 15 years later! Naruto is over!
We made it, everyone! What a ride it's been, too.

So we had a color-packed fanservice filled harry potter epilogue style final chapter to top it off.
Lots of ____ X ____ shipping dreams come true. We have Naruto's kid, Bolt. Though the feeling gets kind of lost pronouncing it like you would in English, "Bolt." Just like you would pronounce "Na-ru-to", his name is "Bo-ru-to". When said in Japanese, the names sound very similar.

When I was looking at Neji's gravestone, I got really confused. For some reason, this had never clicked in my head before. Maybe because I wasn't really translating Naruto during any major arcs with Neji or Hinata, but Hinata's name is always written in Katakana, just like Neji. Their family name, "Hyuuga" is written in kanji as so 日向 which means "in the sun" or "a sunny place" and is read... as "Hinata". So if you didn't know that the family name was actually read as "Hyuuga", you'd look at Hinata's name and think, "Hinata Hinata?". Coincidentally, 日向く would be what sunflowers or "Himawari" do, "face the sun". Okay, pretty dumb and not all that interesting, I know, but I thought it was funny just 'cause I never noticed it. Chances are you all probably did.

So, as you probably know, Japanese sentence structure is Subject Object Verb, different from the general norm of Subject Verb Object. In Japanese, you wouldn't say, "I go to the store." It would be more like "I to the store go." In other words, everyone talks like Yoda.
What I find funny about that, is that the way Yoda talks in The Empire Strikes Back, he adds dramatic pauses to his sentences via phrasing only possible with a Subject Object Verb language, as so often happens in manga. Imagine: "A powerful jedi... you will become." - "A powerful jedi... you are not."

There's a pause after the subject/object in the sentence. You're thinking "A powerful jedi! A powerful jedi what?! Will I be one? Won't I?"
Instead of "You will become... a powerful jedi." "You are not.... a powerful jedi." where you think "I will become what? I am not what?"
The feeling is completely different in the two, and the emphasis and suspense gets placed on the verb, in other words, what will happen/is happening.

A common cliche that pops up in high school romance and shojo manga is the heartthrob boy coming up to the tsundere girl who secretly likes him, and he says "Ore wa... Makoto-chan no koto... ... ..." and then gets interrupted or says something completely opposite of what she was expecting. The expected "cliche" completion of that sentence would be "suki desu.". This would be the equivalent of "I... really love... ... ..." the girl's heart starts beating faster. "Yes?" "I... really love... cashews." followed by the fall take, and some raging anime eyes and smashing heads and such. But the feeling is slightly different. You know the sentence involves him and her. He... something... her. and what that something is is the focus of the suspense and ambiguity. As opposed to the action being clear and to whom or what he is acting upon being the suspensful part of the phrasing.

So when people trail off in sentences, or intentionally leave them incomplete, depending on what it is, it takes some interpretation to convert it to English in a meaningful way. You can't have Naruto say to Sasuke, "Someday... I *mumble cough* you...". Perhaps from the conversation it's implied, he'll see him again one day, he'll save him, he'll bring him back, they'll be together again, whatever. But it could just as easily be, I'll defeat you, I'll kill you, I'll knock your teeth out, I'll bitch slap you for every single time you've said the word "revenge" over these last 15 years, etc. Context is so important.

Which is why it's really important for a translator to kind of be caught up on a series and have a general idea of what's going on and who's who. It can also be very hard sometimes to translate just one bubble by itself with no given context around it for the same reasons. Even being familiar with a series, we'll miss things.
As intended for a reader in Japan, they're expected to see some things as vague or alluding to something they're not sure what, or referencing something they kind of remember from before... well, the hardcore readers will know all the references... and translating, we have to be at that level as well, so that we can properly translate the references and the inside jokes and all that -- because just being a word for word translate bot definitely isn't going to cut it.

None of us claim to be all-knowing oracles of knowledge on the series we translate, but we have an awesome team of great people here at mangastream, and between all of us and the actual all-knowing oracle that is google, we often come up with the answers we need.

Okay. Little boring today, but we've got something pretty interesting and exciting up our sleeves. Expect a hefty interesting blog post when we release that. Otanoshimi ne~!

 

-dzydzydino

 

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